Scalloped Tuna Bake

Scalloped Tuna Bake combines tuna and potatoes in a creamy sauce for a simple and comforting homestyle casserole.

Scalloped Tuna Bake<

Scalloped Tuna Bake

By Sue Lau | Palatable Pastime

Scalloped Tuna Bake is my recipe of the day with the blogging  group Foodie Extravaganza. We get together on the first Wednesday  of the month to blog on  food topics related to a food holiday that occurs during the month. The host gets to choose which holiday (we take turns).

This month Wendy  of the fabulous  food blog A Day in the Life on the Farm has tasked us to come up with a recipe that starts from  a can.

Scalloped Tuna Bake<

You know me.  I come  prepared. At least,  insofar as last year when  grocery shelves were going  empty I bought a fair number of pantry items as I could to stock up. Just in  case.

Fortunately, we didn’t suffer food outages for that long. Unless you were hunting for paper towels, toilet paper or bottled water. And a strange run on bacon.

Then again, stocking up on bacon is always the right thing to do. At least I think  so. I have BLT’s for breakfast a couple times a week. Not  so strange- it’s pretty much like a bacon and egg breakfast with toast. Minus the eggs.

Foodie Extravaganza

Starting  with a Can

Foodie Extravaganza

Scalloped Tuna Bake

Scalloped tuna  bake is very much like a tuna noodle casserole, except it has potatoes in it instead  of egg noodles.  It uses several pantry items, including boxed potato mix, canned tuna, canned soup, and crispy shoestring potato sticks.

I find that the potato sticks stay a little crispier than chips.

You can  serve this as an entree the  same way you would tuna noodle. Or it can also be an extra flavorful scalloped potato side dish. Either way it is super easy to make and will be enjoyed by all.

Scalloped Tuna Bake<

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Next,  Tuna Pot Pie is  a true comfort food and retro classic, with tuna and vegetables  in a creamy  cheese sauce between layers  of flaky pastry.

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Tuna Pasta Salad

Finally, Tuna Pasta Salad gives tuna a starring role in this flavorful, old-fashioned summertime classic pasta salad.

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Scalloped Tuna Bake

Scalloped Tuna Bake

Sue Lau
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 28 mins
Course Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 2 (6-1/2 ounces each) cans tuna packed in water, drained
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup diced onion
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 1 tablespoons minced Italian parsley
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 1 (10-1/2 ounce can) condensed cream of celery soup, undiluted
  • 1 (4.7 ounce) box scalloped potato mix (Betty Crocker)
  • 2 cups crushed potato sticks or kettle potato chips

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 450F.
  • Spray a 2-quart baking dish with nonstick spray or grease liberally.
  • Saute the onion, celery and parsley in oil in a nonstick skillet.
  • In a mixing bowl, whisk together the boiling water, melted butter, milk, and condensed soup.
  • Scatter dehydrated potatoes in the baking dish.
  • Cover with the liquid and drained tuna then stir gently.
  • Place in the preheated oven and bake for 20 minutes.
  • Sprinkle crushed potato sticks on top of the casserole and continue to bake for 5-10 minutes more.

Notes

From the kitchen of palatablepastime.com
Keyword pantry recipes

Scalloped Tuna Bake<

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14 responses

    • It’s funny. I don’t recall my mom ever making a casserole. Not even lasagna. She did bake some scalloped and gratin potatoes from box mix, but otherwise, those casserole dishes gathered dust. I’m not sure she didn’t want to or if it had something to do with what my dad would or would not eat. I know she had cookbooks and loved collecting recipes. I also recall when I got older, diving into those books and cooking things like coquille st. jacques and other things more exotic than sixties and seventies fare. It didn’t go over well with him. Neither did her experiments outside the usual “same thing” turnover.

    • I thought the same thing when I made it. I told Bill “We eat noodles with tuna, why not potatoes? We eat potatoes in other casseroles like moussaka.” It makes me contemplate what other interesting things can be made switching out pasta for potato.

  1. The old standby tuna noodle casserole was my go-to as a poor college student many moons ago (so economical!) and while I rarely make it any more, I do love it. I could totally get on board with your potato switch out!

  2. My mom probably served the Betty Crocker scalloped potatoes at least once a week. This sounds amazing, and the crunchy topping is calling my name.

  3. Doesn’t specify the amount of milk. Doesn’t state where the tuna comes in. Turned out lousy. Waste of ingredients, time and had to call for pizza delivery. Will NOT use these recipes again. First impressions really do count

    • Thanks for your concern. You can always contact me if you have questions. I do want to point out that although there was a typo about where to add the tuna, as to the milk amount, it is right there. Obviously you managed to figure out where to stir the tuna in.
      I may be to blame for the tuna typo, and I apologize for that, but nothing else. I stand by my recipes.
      Good luck (elsewhere) on your cooking adventures.

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