Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin

Delicious slices of glazed pork on a bed of caramelized onions make a very sophisticated grilling entree. The bacon helps make it an easy job to keep the pork moist!
Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin

Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin

by Sue Lau | Palatable Pastime

7.3.14

I had the opportunity to grab some fresh figs at the market. Sometimes I like to put them in salads, but other times I like to make jam. This particular week shopping, there were some nice pork tenderloins on sale as well, and I haven’t made those in awhile.
With the warm weather, grilling is always a great idea as well, when it doesn’t decide to turn heel and go back to early Spring!
And together, a grilled pork tenderloin can be just about perfect with a nice fig glazemade from fresh figs. And of course, port adds depth of flavor. And to finish it off, caramelized onions. Using sweet Vidalia onions and cooking them until they are that blessed golden hue ensures a delicate sweetness that pairs perfectly with the glaze.
And bacon. Who does not love bacon? In this regard it helps add flavor and keep the pork nice and moist.
I do hope you enjoy!
~Sue

Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Time: 1hr
  • Difficulty: advanced
  • Print

Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin
Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 pounds pork tenderloin (not the larger loins, but tenderloin)
  • 4-6 slices smoked bacon (regular, not thick)
  • toothpicks
  • garlic powder
  • salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1-2 large Vidalia onions, thinly sliced

Glaze:

  • 8 ounces fresh figs, chopped
  • 1 large shallot, minced (abt 2-3 tbsp)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 1 cup ruby port wine
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Method:

  1. Season pork tenderloin with garlic powder, salt and black pepper, rubbing these seasonings into the meat.
  2. Wrap bacon slices in a spiral fashion around the pork, securing them with toothpicks (you can remove those when the pork is done.)
  3. In a small saucepan, saute the figs, shallot and rosemary sprig in butter until the shallots soften.
  4. Remove the limp rosemary sprig, then stir in the port, brown sugar and balsamic vinegar.
  5. Cooking over low heat, reduce the sauce until thick, pureeing with an immersion (stick) blender if needed.
  6. While the glaze cooks, saute the onions in butter over low heat until the caramelize; keep warm.
  7. Grill the tenderloin over moderate heat on the grill, basting with the glaze towards the end of cooking, cooking the pork until it reaches about 140-142F, then allowing the pork to rest for 10-15 minutes off the heat until the internal temperature reaches 145F. The pork may have a little pinkness to it, especially being cooked on the grill, but it is safely cooked and done.
  8. After the pork has rested, remove toothpicks and slice, serving the pork medallions with the caramelized onions.

palatablepastime.com


Fig Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Pork Tenderloin

You might also like:

Grilled Brined Pork Chops

Brined Mesquite Grilled Turkey Breast

Jamaican Jerk Baby Back Ribs

Can’t Find a Recipe? | Help
Recipe Index A-M | Recipe Index N-Z | Home

5 Comments

  1. TeresaS says:

    I realize that this is an advance recipe…I have been cooking for at least 45+ years…It isn’t like I had problems cooking the dish…but I can see that others would have a really hard time…there seems to be a lack of cooking times…for the onions, sauce and the tenderloins…but this was tasty…although both the hubby and I really didn’t find the flavor of the sauce in the dish…but when tasty the sauce…it was delicious…of course I forgot to plate the onions and remove the toothpicks the first time around…but I did get the onions on the plate before eating…:( but the hubby wanted to know what those sticks were in his food…:)

    Like

    • The entire cook and prep time is about one hour. In certain things, a recommended cooking time doesn’t really work as well as the final condition of the food. In this case, the fig sauce should be thick, like a ketchup, which is more important than just cooking x-amount of minutes. The same with the pork as it is cooked to temperature, not by minutes. I think you will find if you prepare food to it’s correct final state rather than by a countdown, your cooking will improve. For example, when making toast, is it better to just look at the clock or look at the color of the toasted bread? See what I mean? Cheers- ~s

      Like

  2. Pingback: 40 Grilling Recipes for Labor Day Weekend | Cooking Chat

Did you like this recipe? Looking for a different recipe? Let me know!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s