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Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu) #AppleWeek #AD

Japanese style curry rice (kare raisu) is a soul-satisfying stew with beef, vegetables, and an apple, perfect for an autumn meal.

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

By Sue Lau | Palatable Pastime

This post is sponsored in conjunction with AppleWeek . I received product samples from sponsor companies to aid in the creation of the AppleWeek recipes. All opinions are mine alone.

Swiss Diamond very generously supplied me  with a 5.5-quart nonstick soup pot to demonstrate the cooking of this recipe in. I am very  pleased with it. It’s nice and heavy; has stay-cool handles,  oven safe up to 500ºF, has a steam vent in the knob  lid, and  the non-stick coating has diamond  crystals  in it to make it both durable and resist scratching so I don’t ever see that as having issues with sticking or other concerns with the nonstick, and it is PFOA-free.

Swiss Diamond Soup Pot

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Have You Ever Tried Japanese Curry?

Chances are, if you have only ever eaten Japanese food in a Japanese restaurant, you have never tasted anything remotely like this.  But should you want to eat the way the Japanese do, the way they eat at home, this is the perfect supper, complete  with an autumn apple for #AppleWeek.

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu) Ingredients

Beef for japanese curry Rice

The name of this stew, “Kare Raisu”, means literally, “Curry Rice.” Curry is more commonly an Indian dish, but rather than  just trekking eastward, the curry had to  make its way to England and then back across the Asian continent to Japan before it became popular there (and it is indeed popular). And along the way it picked up a few changes.

Browning Beef and Aromatics

Ready to Simer Stew

How Does it Taste?

The taste  is not solidly like a beef curry  anymore, but has a Western  influence that makes it a hybrid with beef stew. And by the time it had reached Japan,  it had gained a little bit of fruity sweetness, often from bananas or apples, and was commonly served with rice.

I’d read somewhere that the Japanese make this at home around three times per month. And  while I don’t know for certain if that is true, I could certainly believe it. The aromas linger. The next day after making this for dinner  I came down for breakfast and the house around the kitchen still smelled so good.

Japanese Curry Mix

Japanese Curry Roux

Even Better the Next Day

As stews often go,  the leftovers will reheat even better than the first time, so this is not a  problem moving right along the meal planner.  I took the extra time  proffered by having had such a big pot of delicious dinner  to move  ahead and use my cooking time to bake a cake and had that stew again for an encore supper. Even though I know it would freeze very well. I had not tired of it.

Thickening StewJapanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

Soup Pot

Would you like to purchase the 5.5 Quart soup pot like the one I used in this post for yourself or as a gift?

This post contains affiliate links, which help defray my website costs by earning a small percentage of your  purchase (should you decide to make a  purchase using the provided links). You can view the links at no cost to you and your purchase price remains the same as if you had accessed the shop normally,  so no worries.

Rafflecopter Giveaway

Don’t forget we have a giveaway going  on. Click the link  to go to the #AppleWeek  Welcome page to sign up. There are lots of delicious prizes to be had, including the beautiful soup pot like the one I used in this post, as part of a complete Swiss Diamond cookware set.

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons  olive oil
  • 2 pounds boneless beef chuck  roast, cut  into chunks
  • salt and black pepper
  • 1  large onion,  chopped
  • 1/2 pound carrots,  chopped
  • 2 large russet potatoes,  peeled and diced
  • 1 firm apple, peeled, cored and grated
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon  soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 6 cups beef broth  or stock
  • 2 (5 ounces each) boxes Japanese curry roux (Golden curry or  Vermont  curry)
  • steamed cooked rice as desired

Method:

  1. Melt butter with oil and saute the onions in the soup pot until softened and lightly browned.
  2. Season the beef with salt  and black  pepper then add to the onions, browning the beef chunks on all sides.
  3. Stir in the carrots, potatoes, grated apple, bay  leaves, ketchup, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and stock.
  4. Taste and season the cooking liquid as needed.
  5. Bring mixture to a boil, and skim  off any foam.
  6. Cover pot, reduce heat and simmer for one hour or until meat is tender.
  7. Break apart curry roux into pieces and add to the stew, stirring to mix and melt.
  8. Continue stirring over low heat for another 10-15 minutes, stirring up from the bottom  of the pan, until stew is nicely thick.
  9. Serve with steamed rice.

From  the kitchen of palatablepastime.com

Japanese Beef Curry (Kare Raisu)

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10 responses

    • It’s different from say Indian curry or Thai curry. It’s mild and very good, especially if you adore both curry and traditional beef stew.

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