Corned Beef Hash

Corned beef hash made with extras from your brisket along with potatoes and onion makes a wonderful breakfast topped with an egg.
Corned Beef Hash

Corned Beef Hash

By Sue Lau | Palatable Pastime

Corned beef  hash is  my recipe of the day with the From  Our Dinner Table blogging  group. I make this recipe  often,  as I always have a little corned  beef after  making  a brisket,  and even when I don’t, cans of corned beef are a pantry staple.

Corned Beef Hash

Making hash is a cinch. It is basically chopped and browned until the potatoes are done. You can use leftover potatoes to make this, but brown your onions first, and the potatoes then need only to be browned themselves, like brown and serve sausage.

Hash is  always  the  most wonderful topped with a poached  or fried egg. And these I vary depending  on my  mood (but I always like a runny yolk).

The poached eggs seem to be a subject of fear among the masses. And really. There isn’t much to it if you know a few things.

First- about eggs. They contain albumin in the eggs when they are fresh is what keeps the uncooked white in a clump. This is very good for cooking poached eggs. If your eggs are older, the albumin shrinks from the membrane and the eggs tend to be more watery, which you don’t really want the egg running all over the place when you are poaching your eggs. So use fresher eggs for poached.

Corned Beef Hash

And what to do with those older eggs that have been sitting in the fridge all week?

Let me tell you something else you may not know, especially with Easter coming up soon. In older eggs, when the albumin shrinks away from the shell, surprise! When the boiled  are peeled, they tend to stick and tear LESS. Yep. That’s the secret. For Easter, make sure you buy your eggs about a week before you plan to dye eggs or you will regret it. You *might* get lucky and buy ones that have been sitting around (there is a big market for having lots of eggs for sale just before Easter and guess how they do that?)

But back to the poached eggs- a couple other things help your egg out when poaching it. One is the vinegar- which doesn’t (or shouldn’t) make your egg taste funny. And the other is swirling the water, which holds the white closer in while the simmering water first starts to set the exterior of the egg. And the last thing I should mention (for obvious reasons) is not to use an egg with a broken yolk. Save that one for baking, scrambling, omelettes, fried rice, or hard cooked fried egg sammies.

Now all this being said, you should be ready to tackle your poachy breakfast. 😉

Corned Beef Hash

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Corned Beef Hash

 

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Corned Beef Hash

Corned Beef Hash

Corned Beef Hash

Sue Lau
Total Time 35 mins
Course Main Dish
Cuisine American

Ingredients
  

  • 1.5 pounds russet potatoes peeled and diced
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 8 ounces cooked or leftover corned beef chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • eggs optional, if you want poached or fried
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar any type (if making poached eggs)

Instructions
 

  • Cook potatoes, onion, thyme, garlic, salt, and pepper in cooking oil in a large nonstick skillet, gently turning occasionally, for about 20-25 minutes or until  potatoes are cooked through and browned, adding corned beef the last 5 minutes or so just to heat through.
  • If you want poached eggs, heat 2 cups water in a small saucepan with 1 tablespoon vinegar until it just simmers. Keep it at a simmer, and by that, I mean little bubbles coming up from the bottom, but not quite boiling.
  • Break your eggs singly into small dishes.
  • When water is simmering, use a spoon to swirl the water around into a whirlpool. While the water is still swirling, bring the dish close to the water and very gently tilt it so the egg goes in without a "plop". Keep a close eye on the water and do NOT let it boil. Turn it down if it tries, and note that this may affect your poaching time, which should be from 2-4 minutes.
  • To gauge the doneness of your egg, put a spoon beneath it and lift it just a little bit, and give it a little jiggle. How much the yolk area wiggles will let you know how soft it is- a bit of jiggling for runny yolk, less for a more cooked egg. You know what you like. 😉
  • When it is done, lift it out with a slotted spoon onto a bed of hash or toast. If you don't use the slotted spoon it is going to add water to your plate.
  • Serve cooked hash topped with a fried or poached egg.

Notes

From the kitchen of palatablepastime.com
Keyword breakfast, Corned Beef, Poached Eggs, potatoes

Corned Beef Hash

5 responses

  1. I was going to make hash with my leftover corned beef and when I went into the fridge for it….it was gone….someone had a late night snack attack LOL.

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